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Posts tagged: culture

beautiful-basque-country:

Folk Faces" by Asier Bastida.

These portraits are part of an exhibition held in the Bilbao underground to promote the 39th International Folkore Festival of Portugalete (July 24th-27th).

If only the world remained as colourful and personal as in these portraits…

ninewhitebanners:

Kazakh eagle hunters in the Altai Mountains, Mongolia. The golden eagles are traditionally trained to hunt foxes, wolves, and wild sheep, and the furs are made into coats and hats to keep warm in the crazy Mongolian winter. 
Photo by Jimmy Nelson.

ninewhitebanners:

Kazakh eagle hunters in the Altai Mountains, Mongolia. The golden eagles are traditionally trained to hunt foxes, wolves, and wild sheep, and the furs are made into coats and hats to keep warm in the crazy Mongolian winter. 

Photo by Jimmy Nelson.


Ghost Dance 
The Ghost Dance religion (or movement) was an answer to the subjugation of Native Americans by the U.S. government. It was an attempt to revitalize traditional culture and to find a way to face increasing poverty, hunger, and disease, all representing the reservation life of the Native Americans in the late nineteenth century. 
The Ghost Dance originated among the Paiute Indians around 1870. However, the tide of the movement came in 1889 with a Paiute shaman Wovoka (Jack Wilson). Wovoka had a vision during a sun eclipse in 1889. In this vision he saw the second coming of Christ and received warning about the evils of white man. The messianic religion promised an apocalypse that would destroy the earth and the white man. The earth then would be restored to the Native Americans. Salvation of individuals was to be achieved by purging oneself of the evil ways learned from the whites. The religion required frequent ceremonial cleansing, meditation, prayer, chanting and of course dancing the Ghost Dance. Each ceremony lasted for five successive days. The participants danced each night, on the last night the dance continued until morning. The ceremony was to be repeated every six weeks. Within a year, the new religion spread throughout the Native camps in the West, giving Native people the much needed hope.more 

Ghost Dance 

The Ghost Dance religion (or movement) was an answer to the subjugation of Native Americans by the U.S. government. It was an attempt to revitalize traditional culture and to find a way to face increasing poverty, hunger, and disease, all representing the reservation life of the Native Americans in the late nineteenth century. 

The Ghost Dance originated among the Paiute Indians around 1870. However, the tide of the movement came in 1889 with a Paiute shaman Wovoka (Jack Wilson). Wovoka had a vision during a sun eclipse in 1889. In this vision he saw the second coming of Christ and received warning about the evils of white man. The messianic religion promised an apocalypse that would destroy the earth and the white man. The earth then would be restored to the Native Americans. Salvation of individuals was to be achieved by purging oneself of the evil ways learned from the whites. The religion required frequent ceremonial cleansing, meditation, prayer, chanting and of course dancing the Ghost Dance. Each ceremony lasted for five successive days. The participants danced each night, on the last night the dance continued until morning. The ceremony was to be repeated every six weeks. Within a year, the new religion spread throughout the Native camps in the West, giving Native people the much needed hope.

more 

doscko:

♣xolo♣

doscko:

♣xolo♣

Photography of Jan Banning, Dutch artist for his serie National Identities. Featured in the last Newsweek number.

But what is this supposedly monolithic and static national culture, in Holland and elsewhere? Migration is not a new phenomenon and often, immigrants have played an influential and constructive role in different sectors of society, such as economics and culture.

The 17th century was economically and culturally Holland’s Golden Age.  

Jan Banning