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miss-a-stan:

if i see one more shitty and condescending comic about how workers are all droid-like hiveminds wasting their life away while intellectuals and artists are the true shining beacons for us all to follow i’m going to smash up an art gallery with a hammer

thefrogman:

runs-on-ramen:

necessary:

he needs those parts for his space ship

he’s going to otter space

[source]

thefrogman:

runs-on-ramen:

necessary:

he needs those parts for his space ship

he’s going to otter space

[source]

featheredprince:

Allosaurus feeding her chicks, by James Gurney
The young are covered with a white coat of downy feathers.

featheredprince:

Allosaurus feeding her chicks, by James Gurney

The young are covered with a white coat of downy feathers.

sethpargin:

Some animal sketches and a giraffe-based character design for my sketching class.

nanshe-of-nina:

WOMEN’S HISTORYMALINALLI (c. 1496-1501 – c. 1529)

Malinalli (also known as "La Malinche" and "Malintzin"), was a Nahua woman and daughter of a cacique. Bernal Diaz claimed that she was sold into slavery by her mother and stepfather while Francisco López de Gómara claimed she was kidnapped by Maya merchants.

Nevertheless, both sources agree that in 1519, she was one of the slave girls given to the Spaniards by the Chontal Maya. Malinalli and the other girls were baptized (with Malinalli being christened “Doña Marina”) and becoming the property of Alonso Hernández de Puertocarrero. She later became Hernán Cortés’ interpreter and adviser and later bore him a son.

Very little else is known about the real Malinalli, but she has taken on mythic status and has been variously depicted as a virtuous lady, as a symbolic mother of a new people, as a traitor and a whore, and as both victim and survivor.
archaicwonder:

Ancient Greek Dog Rhyton, c. 340-325 BC
Molded into the shape of a Laconian dog, the rhyton comes from the ancient Greek colony of Apulia, in what is now southern Italy. The vessel was designed with a wide mouth at one end, with the other pierced with a small hole.
It is believed that the cup would have been used to scoop wine from a larger carrier, blocking the hole with a thumb, before releasing again to let the fluid drain out. The stunning item bears the trademark style of ancient Greece, painted in black over terracotta.

archaicwonder:

Ancient Greek Dog Rhyton, c. 340-325 BC

Molded into the shape of a Laconian dog, the rhyton comes from the ancient Greek colony of Apulia, in what is now southern Italy. The vessel was designed with a wide mouth at one end, with the other pierced with a small hole.

It is believed that the cup would have been used to scoop wine from a larger carrier, blocking the hole with a thumb, before releasing again to let the fluid drain out. The stunning item bears the trademark style of ancient Greece, painted in black over terracotta.

lucianawestenra:

HISTORY MEME | 1/10 moments: Jadwiga is Crowned King of Poland.

The coronation ceremony that took place in the Wawel Cathedral in Krakow on 16 October 1384 was truly a splendid event: Polish nobles spared no expenses and the grandeur of the coronation impressed everyone present. But the historical significance was even greater. For one thing, the young girl who was being crowned (only 11 years old at the time) was to go down in history as one of Poland’s greatest and most beloved Monarchs. And for another, the aforementioned lady was crowned not as Queen of Poland (as would be expected considering her gender) but as King.
There is no humorous tale of a mix-up: the decision was made for quite practical reasons. Polish law was very specific that the ruler had to be King – but it did not state the King had to be a male. And so instead of re-writing the law and to emphasise the fact Jadwiga was a ruler in her own right, it was decided she should be crowned as Hedvig Rex Poloniæ (Hedwig, King of Poland) and not Hedvig Regina Poloniæ (Hedwig, Queen of Poland).

lucianawestenra:

HISTORY MEME | 1/10 moments: Jadwiga is Crowned King of Poland.

The coronation ceremony that took place in the Wawel Cathedral in Krakow on 16 October 1384 was truly a splendid event: Polish nobles spared no expenses and the grandeur of the coronation impressed everyone present. But the historical significance was even greater. For one thing, the young girl who was being crowned (only 11 years old at the time) was to go down in history as one of Poland’s greatest and most beloved Monarchs. And for another, the aforementioned lady was crowned not as Queen of Poland (as would be expected considering her gender) but as King.

There is no humorous tale of a mix-up: the decision was made for quite practical reasons. Polish law was very specific that the ruler had to be King – but it did not state the King had to be a male. And so instead of re-writing the law and to emphasise the fact Jadwiga was a ruler in her own right, it was decided she should be crowned as Hedvig Rex Poloniæ (Hedwig, King of Poland) and not Hedvig Regina Poloniæ (Hedwig, Queen of Poland).